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in prison for his opinions. someone else who also led to jail was britain's greatest investigative journalist if you have read king leopold's goes to will remember him as the man who exposed the brutalities of the king leopold congo and his term was extremely harsh and he died not long after words really as a result. a very brave man. war opponents like this were up against the unceasing verizon of propaganda. here is the u.s. army recruiting poster from the period, a typical of things you saw on both sides. a german poster, with god 14 and fatherland. a poster warning against for heaven's sake say potential german invasion of australia. some of the probe for propaganda has an edge to it. you would be letting down the when and if you did not fight. or perhaps you were all blimp evading your responsibility and worse yet if you refuse to fight maybe you were a feminist. there was a nasty edge to the patriotic fervor in the air. as i mentioned, there were more resistors in all the countries we were fighting, but for various reasons the sharpest conflict between those who thought the w
in today. these are officer cadets at britain's most exclusive private school drilling in 1915. now, one of the things about the wars that we have gotten accustomed to in this country in recent years, vietnam, iraq, and the stand is that they are fox mostly by the poor. they are are very very few among the dead and wounded in those three wars who have been sons or daughters off ceos, senators, members of congress, anything like that. it was the exact opposite and the first world war. the death toll actually fell proportionately higher on the upper classes. and the main reason for that was that it was customary for sons of the upper classes, sons of the aristocracy, to have military careers. and i think a major reason for this is that armies are not only there to fight wars against other countries. they are there to maintain order at home. the 19th century was a very tumultuous time in europe, so was the early 20th century. many of the european armies were used to break strikes or the british army you know, put down tenant farmer rebellions in ireland, and so therefore officer in the army
. it's still galloping its way through great britain where it is the story. tomorrow we get to hear from rupert murdoch. tonight there's another new development in this. we want to begin our reporting with nbc's stephanie gosk in london. stephanie, good evening. >> good evening, brian. every day since this scandal broke, there seems it be a new bombshell. revelations, resignations, arrests. the last 24 hours are no exception. it's left people in this country wondering and worried what will happen next. the fabled scotland yard is reeling after two sudden resignations of its most senior leadership. sir paul stephenson, the police chief, and his deputy, john yates, career policemen who are the latest casualties in the phone hacking scandal. scotland yard is being accused of mishandling the investigation into "news of the world qug, maintaining at times close relationships with the very people they were supposed to be investigating. police officers accepting bribes from reporters has allegedly been commonplace. stephenson and yates deny any wrong doing on their part. >> i have acted wi
demanding to know in newspapers in britain broke any laws in the united states. not only for alleged phone hacking and privacy violations, but those that might involve 9/11 victims and also possible violations of america's foreign corrupt practices laws. one of the lawmakers calling for the investigation is republican congressman peter king of new york. among the four democrats of new jersey, senator lautenberg. >> they have no right to break the laws. they are an american corporation. it wouldn't matter if they were selling tires or selling roofs or what have you. those are the rules, those are the laws that we have to obey. >> we are getting reports this morning scotland yards made an arrest in connection with the news corporation's phone hacking scandal. london's top cop is going to be in the hot seat today. let's bring in dan rivers. he has the latest live in london this morning. good morning, dan. >> reporter: good morning, yeah. another arrest this morning in this police inquiry. we understand that may be a former editor of "the news of the world." that's according to sky news here.
of collapse, and it will not collapse. it is very much like britain and rome. if you look at the realms beaches in the senate, just before the empire, use the absolute predictions of catastrophe. that happened to. >> host: okay, so 10 years so now we'll come back and have this conversation. we will see how it worked out. >> guest: it will be the same conversation. >> host: thank you so much. it's been a great conversation today. >> guest: i enjoyed it. >> that was "after words," booktv signature program in which authors of latest nonfiction books are in the by journalists, public policymakers, legislators and others familiar with the material. "after words" airs every weekend on booktv at 10 p.m. on saturday, 12 and 9 p.m. on sunday and 12 a.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" online. go to and click on "after words" in the booktv series on the upper right side of the page. >> up next on booktv, investigative reporter annie jacobsen presents the history of the military base, area 51, which is located in the nevada desert. the author use of recently declassified doc
along in britain with more sort of suggestions that cameron is under pressure today. he is out country. this story not going away. >> dan rivers, we will keep checking with you. seems there are developments in this story every few hours. >> thanks, dan. >>> there has been a major shake-up in the egyptian government. it is not clear whether it is enough to quiet opposition protesters. egypt's prime minister appointing 14 new cabinet ministers to his cabinet while keeping 13 others in place. they will be sworn into office today. former egyptian president hosni mubarak reportedly slipped into a coma yesterday. the hospital's spokesman tells cnn he has since regained consciousness. >>> hours ago general david petraeus performed his last act as commander of nato forces in afghanistan. he handed off authority to the new komd ander john allen. petraeus is retiring from the army at the end of the month. he will be taking over as director of the cia in september. >> that's right. the government not able to pay its bills is looming large they are morning. the clock ticks towards the deadline. 16
, back to you. >> we'll talk to you again shortly. >>> people in britain as you know angry over this whole phone hacking, this tabloid scandal and now they are focusing their anger on rupert murdoch. >> shame on you shame shame on you shame. shame on you! >> shame on you. that's just some of the reaction right now in london over this whole hacking scandal. but murdoch has a new message for some of those upset with him and also some of the victims of the scandal. also, the debt ceiling debate. president obama is now issuing a challenge to republicans. compromise, would you? we've got the republican response. that is next. we're getting close to the top of the hour here on the "cnn of the hour here on the "cnn saturday morning." -- captions by vitac -- access in an instant every patient's past. and because the whole hospital's working together, there's a family who can breathe easy, right now. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest healthcare questions. and the over 60,000 people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answer
it was authoritarianism, racism, eugenics, imperialism and outside of france and the united states and britain and a couple of constitutional monarchies and scandinavia you've got rise of authoritarianism three terrapin in the depression obviously in hitler's terminally and miscellany italy but elsewhere, and i do think there is a link that is when you have slow growth you might think everyone will say let's pitch in together and save the nation, but it's not just here, it's most democracies we've had the experience. the horizons contract and the group's, whatever they may be you want to hang on to what you have and the fear that someone else will do better than you and shrinking the economy tends to power politics and its very frightening. >> it's a sort of zero some mentality. bill, to one to that anything? >> we didn't like one another when things were going good. [laughter] and that's because politics now is not based on class trips, it's lifestyle groups and so those relationships have broken. >> i would say the lack of cohesion that i think about is not a function of the economy as much
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)